Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
with nelson mandela. mr. swatwali, thank you for joining us. give us some thoughts, what it was like during the apartheid regime. tell us what it was like, eye specially on robben island in prison. >> well, let me first say that our people in south africa and the world have lost . >>> that's what we learned from nelson mandela. during the dark days with him on robben island. today he is seen as an icon of the world, whose teachings, as well as principles need to be embraced by all. he was embraced even by his own jailers, because he demonstrated that through the power of dialogue through the elements and two of reconciliation, people on different sides, former enemies, can come together. that's how -- we solve our intractable problems. we concluded that in order for us to create a new democratic society for a united and nonviolent south africa was to embrace all people. that was seen through the -- >> i have a pictures, mr. sexwale, of the cell. it's robben island. i think we'll be able to show our viewers, a cell where mr. nelson mandela spent so many years. there it is right there. awful
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
mandela with great fondness and great respect, but few knew him as well as bill clinton. joining us now, the former president of the united states, bill clinton. mr. president, thanks very much for sharing some thoughts on this special day. >> i'm glad to do it, wolf. >> what was it like the first time you met nelson mandela? >> well, i was excited. i felt almost like i was 20 years old again. it was at the democratic convention in new york. i was about to be nominated for president and former mayor david dinkins, a long-time supporter of mandela's, brought him up to our room where he met with hillary, chelsea and me. we hit it off right away. he was there really because he was an incredibly loyal person to anyone who supported him and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's whe
to nelson mandela. on board air force one with president and mrs. obama, president george wurks bush and first lady laura bush and former secretary of state hillary clinton. on the way to south africa, they gathered together in the plane's conference room telling their stories that spanned three presidential administrations. president's clinton and carter are traveling separately to johannesburg. the last time these presidents were all together was in april at the opening of the george w. bush presidential library, but this event in a foreign country will mean much greater security concerned. sources involved in planning president clinton's prim to the funeral of israel prime minister rabin, and the funeral of pope john paul ii tells cnn it decrease nerve-racking to depend on a foreign country. >> they do a lot of planning and they're very good at this. the south africans have challenges, in addition to security, logistical challenges. >> reporter: the memorial service will take place in a soccer stadium that holds 90,000 people. more than 90 world leaders are expected to attend. lea
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7